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9/24/2018  |   11:45 AM - 12:15 PM   |  Emerald Ballroom I

Maternal CMV-DNAemia, CMV Hyperimmuneglobulin (HIG), and Neonatal Outcome in Pregnant Women with Primary CMV Infection

Background. HIG improves neonatal outcome after a primary CMV infection during pregnancy. We studied the association of HIG, maternal CMV-DNAemia, and fetal/neonatal outcome. Methods. CMV-DNA testing occurred before and after HIG infusions in HIG-treated women, >2 times among HIG untreated patients with positive DNAemia, and only before HIG or once from women with negative DNAemia. HIG groups: 1) 78 women with DNAemia, who had the first HIG infusion 3-19 weeks after maternal infection, and were re-examined within <1 to 7 weeks; 2) 66 women without DNAemia, who had the first HIG infusion 4-16 weeks after infection. Untreated groups: 3) 55women with DNAemia and 4) 84women without initial DNAemia. Results.The lowest rate of congenital infection was group 2 (HIG-treated, DNA negative) where 10 (14%) of 69 infants were infected. This rate was lower (P < 0.0001) than the 45% rate for 84 untreated women who were DNA negative (group 4) and the 42% rate for 79 infants whose mothers were DNA positive and HIG treated (Group 1). The highest rate (78%) of congenital infection occurred among 55 women who were DNA positive and were untreated. This rate was significantly higher (P<0.00001) than the other 3 groups. At 1 year of age the CMV disease rate was highest (33%) among 36 infected infants born of untreated women with positive DNAemia, and was only 3% in 65 infected infants from HIG-treated women (P<0.01). Resolution of CMV DNAemia was not associated with HIG (P= 0.16) but negative DNA 3 weeks from the first positive DNA occurred in 20 of 54 HIG-treated women (37%) but in none of 8 untreated women (P = 0.045). Conclusions. In pregnant women with a primary infection maternal viremia predicts neonatal outcome. HIG improved neonatal outcome regardless of initial DNAemia.

  • CMV is a serious cause of CMV disease
  • Maternal viremia predicts a poor outcome
  • HIG is effective for women and their children

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Giovanni Nigro (Primary Presenter), nigrogio@libero.it;
Clinical invesigator

      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


      AAA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.




Stuart Adler (Author,Co-Author), spadler123@gmail.com;
CMV Researcher for several decades

      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.


      AAA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.